Future of Work: Scenario Planning for COVID-19 Recovery

Authors: Alexandra Pan, Susan Shaheen, PhD Date: November 2022 Abstract: The COVID-19 pandemic caused widespread lockdowns across the world in early 2020, with major implications to spatial and temporal commuting patterns as a result of increased work from home (also known as telework) activities. There has been a high degree of uncertainty on what work from home impacts will persist in the future. In this report, we first conduct a thorough review of news articles, published reports, and peer-reviewed literature to summarize telework trends. We also use scenario planning to bring together ten experts from academia, public sector, industry, and commercial real estate in two 1.5-hour long workshops to discuss the impacts of telework on transportation, housing, commercial real estate, and land use. View...

Mobility on Demand: State of the Industry Practitioner Census, Fall 2021

Authors: Susan Shaheen, Adam Cohen, Jacquelyn Broader Date: November 1, 2021 Abstract: The Transportation Sustainability Research Center (TSRC) at the University of California, Berkeley is pleased to present the results of the Mobility on Demand (MOD) State of the Industry Practitioner Census. The global pandemic has led to a challenging period for the transportation sector. Nevertheless, the industry has shown resilience and innovation. This industry outlook provides information on MOD and Mobility as a Service (MaaS) developments throughout the United States (U.S.) and highlights some industry changes in response to the pandemic. View...

3rd Annual Shared Micromobility State of the Industry Report

Authors: North American Bikeshare & Scooter Share Association Date: August 2022 Abstract: NABSA is pleased to present our third annual Shared Micromobility State of the Industry Report. In 2021, the industry continued to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic with shared micromobility filling critical gaps in essential mobility. The industry continued to rebound and demonstrate tremendous resilience, with the number of systems growing past pre-pandemic levels. This report tracks that progress and the trends that are emerging in the industry. To inform this report, we have collected data across a wide variety of topics, including ridership metrics, user profiles, employment, equity, and community benefits. Our data sources include surveys sent to shared micromobility operators and public agencies across North America, supplemented by research reports on shared micromobility, census data, and other data that is tracked by NABSA. This 2021 State of the Industry report shows a snapshot in time, providing a comparison for tracking trends with previous years and marking successes and challenges as the industry continues to evolve. See page 19 for detailed notes on methodology. View...

Roundtrip Carsharing in New York City: An Evaluation of a Pilot Program and System Impacts

Authors: Elliot Martin, Adam Stocker, Aqshems Nichols, Susan Shaheen Date: February 2021 Abstract:  The study found that roundtrip carsharing in NYC mostly serves as a substitute for car rental, other personal vehicle modes, and personal vehicle ownership. The analysis showed that the broader pilot program had a modest impact on user behavior through carsharing (i.e., reduced vehicle ownership, reduced VMT, and mode shift). It also found that the pilot program likely expanded the membership base of carsharing to demographic cohorts that are traditionally underrepresented in carsharing populations (i.e., increased participation by lower education levels, lower household incomes, minority demographics). The study also examined vehicle ownership impacts and changes in vehicle miles traveled (VMT) and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Analysis of survey and activity data indicated that 7% of NYC carsharing members avoided a car purchase, and 0.61% of members got rid of a car they already owned due to carsharing. Across the membership base, VMT was reduced by 7% and GHG emissions were reduced by 6%. These findings showed that carsharing reduced VMT and delivered associated environmental benefits within NYC, and more broadly had a substantive impact on travel behavior among members in form of mode shift away from personal automotive modes. View...

Understanding Curb Management and Targeted Incentive Policies to Increase Transportation Network Company Pooling and Public Transit Linkages

Authors: Susan Shaheen, PhD, Wesley Darling, Jacquelyn Broader, and Adam Cohen Date: August 1, 2021 Abstract: Transportation network company (TNCs) rides that are shared amongst users (i.e., pooled) can offer a variety of benefits including increased mobility and reduced transportation emissions. However, very few TNC users select pooled trips and not all pooled rides are matched with other riders. This report supports increased poolingby exploring different pooling strategies and incentives. TNC userswere actively engagedto offer insightsthrough the photovoice methodology (a participatory research method that allows community members to use photography to communicate their personal experiences and perceptions). The researchers gathered further information through interviews with four photovoice experts and 10 pooling stakeholders, four photovoice groups and one individual interview with a total of15 TNC users, and a workshop with five expert stakeholders and 12 photovoice group participants. The different researchmethods resulted in the development of four key takeaways and five policy recommendations. View...