One-Way Electric Vehicle Carsharing in San Diego: An Exploration of the Behavioral Impacts of Pricing Incentives on Operational Efficiency

Authors: Susan Shaheen, Ph.D., Elliot Martin, Ph.D., Apaar Bansal Date: January 2018 Abstract: This project is a two-year evaluation of pricing/incentives applied to the one-way, all electric carsharing system operated by car2go in San Diego, CA. This system is the only electric vehicle-based, one-way carsharing system with instant access (i.e., accessible without reservation) operating in the U.S. The goal of this project is to work with car2go and the San Diego region to develop and evaluate pricing/incentive structures for their members, which improve system operational efficiency (vehicle redistribution, state-of-charge management, use of vehicles placed at public transit stations) and encourage shared-vehicle use. View...

How Public Education on Ecodriving Can Reduce Both Fuel Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Authors: Elliot Martin, Ph.D., Howard Chan, Susan Shaheen, Ph.D. Date: March 2012 Abstract: Ecodriving, the concept of changing driving behavior and vehicle maintenance to affect fuel consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in existing vehicles, has recently gained prominence in North America. One ecodriving strategy involves public education with information disseminated on the Internet. This paper presents the results of a study conducted from June to December 2010 that assessed the effectiveness of static, web-based information on ecodriving with controlled stated responses from approximately 100 faculty, staff, and students at the University of California, Berkeley. A comparison of the experimental and control groups revealed that exposure to ecodriving information influenced people’s driving behavior and maintenance practices. The experimental group’s distributional shift in behavior was statistically significant, particularly for key practices, including lower highway cruising speed, adjustment of driving behavior, and proper tire inflation. Within the experimental group (N = 51), only 16% of respondents significantly changed their maintenance practices whereas 71% altered some driving practices; these data suggest that intentional alteration of driving behavior is easier than is planning better maintenance practices. A comparison of before-and-after surveys revealed that 57% of the experimental group improved their ecodriving behavior and that 43% made no change or worsened. Key characteristics of the drivers who improved included being female, living in smaller households, and owning a newer car with higher fuel economy. Although it was evident that not everyone modified behavior as a result of reviewing the website, even small shifts in behavior attributable to inexpensive dissemination of information could be deemed cost-effective in reducing fuel consumption and emissions. View...

Understanding Evacuee Behavior: A Case Study of Hurricane Irma

Authors: Stephen Wong, Susan Shaheen, PhD, Joan Walker, PhD Date: December 2018 Abstract: In September 2017, Hurricane Irma prompted one of the largest evacuations in U.S. history of over six million people. This mass movement of people, particularly in Florida, required considerable amounts of public resources and infrastructure to ensure the safety of all evacuees in both transportation and sheltering. Given the extent of the disaster and the evacuation, Hurricane Irma is an opportunity to add to the growing knowledge of evacuee behavior and the factors that influence a number of complex choices that individuals make before, during, and after a disaster. At the same time, emergency management agencies in Florida stand to gain considerable insight into their response strategies through a consolidation of effective practices and lessons learned. To explore these opportunities, we distributed an online survey (n = 645) across Florida with the help of local agencies through social media platforms, websites, and alert services. Areas impacted by Hurricane Irma were targeted for survey distribution. The survey also makes notable contributions by including questions related to reentry, a highly under-studied aspect of evacuations. To determine both evacuee and non-evacuee behavior, we analyze the survey data using descriptive statistics and discrete choice models. We conduct this analysis across a variety of critical evacuation choices including decisions related to evacuating or staying, departure timing, destination, evacuation shelter, transportation mode, route, and reentry timing. View...

An Equitable and Integrated Approach to Paying for Roads in a Time of Rapid Change.

Authors: Alexandre Bayen, PhD; Susan Shaheen, PhD; Teddy Forscher; and Jessica Lazarus Date: February 2019 Abstract: A brief overview of transportation user fees (historically and in a contemporary context) is presented followed by a discussion on how segmenting travel into three categories – long haul, the last mile, and at the curb – creates a new typology for transportation pricing and access mechanisms. A case study based upon California’s recent Road Charge Pilot Program demonstrates a quantitative example for a blended long haul/last mile approach using a parametric mileage-based user fee (MBUF); the case investigates distributional cost burdens under different pricing calibration scenarios. There are many ways to raise the same amount of money with a parametric structure, but compared to a gas tax and flat mileage-based fee, a parametric structure may produce a better distribution of cost burdens. Technical, political, legal, and other considerations for implementing an MBUF are discussed, drawn from a literature review of current efforts; often these aspects can direct the development of a pricing mechanism as much if not more than empirically derived goals. The conclusion discusses how this approach can aid in the development of pricing mechanisms that move closer to the user-pays principle. View PDF. DOI:...

California Transportation Plan 2050: Northern and Southern California Visioning Sessions Findings

Authors: Susan Shaheen, PhD, Hannah Totte, Adam Cohen Date: December 2018 Abstract: Improving California’s transportation system requires cross-sector collaboration, particularly as technologies, policies, and regulations develop simultaneously. The California Transportation Plan (CTP) 2050 aims to integrate perspectives a diverse array of stakeholder perspectives that may not typically participate in the statewide planning process. The Visioning Sessions facilitated two day-long visioning workshops in October 2018 in Southern and Northern California. Overall, these visioning sessions initiated a much-needed dialogue among experts and practitioners from diverse backgrounds and allowed participants to conceptualize idealized visions for California’s transportation system through 2050. Key goals of the visioning sessions included: 1. Developing visions for CTP2050 incorporating diverse perspectives from an array of statewide stakeholders including private and public sector, academic, and non-profit experts; 2. Identifying existing and policy and investment strategies to actualize the idealized states; and 3. Translating high-level policy and investment suggestions into actionable items. View...