MOD Sandbox Demonstrations Independent Evaluation: Los Angeles County and Puget Sound MOD First and Last Mile Partnership with Via Evaluation Plan

MOD Sandbox Demonstrations Independent Evaluation: Los Angeles County and Puget Sound MOD First and Last Mile Partnership with Via Evaluation Plan

Authors: Gustave Cordahi; Susan Shaheen, PhD; Elliot Martin, PhD; and Mikaela Hoffman-Stapleton Date: December 2018 Abstract:  Through a partnership-driven approach, LA Metro, KCM, ST, and Via (an on-demand transportation network company or TNC) will work together to develop, deploy, and analyze two analogous pilot programs designed to test the viability of transit agency-TNC partnerships to deliver equitable first- and last-mile access to the transit network. Three transit stations were selected in the Los Angeles region, and four stations were selected in the PS region for the pilot. Pilot locations were selected with strong consideration for equity, geographic diversity, current first and last mile access, potential trip generators, operational density, and current available transit service. Areas were also evaluated to determine where there is currently untapped demand, such as employment centers that are challenging to reach with the existing network. Upon pilot launch, customers will be able to request subsidized Via rides to or from the participating transit stations, within a specified radius of the transit station during specified times of the day. In the Los Angeles region, the selected stations are North Hollywood (Red Line Station in the City of Los Angeles), El Monte (Silver Line Station in the City of El Monte), and Artesia (Blue Line Station in the City of Compton). In the PS region, the selected stations are Tukwila International Boulevard Station, Othello Station, Columbia City Station, and Mount Baker Station (Link Right Rail Stations). The service will operate within defined regions around each station. The service areas were determined to ensure that each area’s unique mobility circumstances were properly considered. Time periods in which the...
MOD Sandbox Demonstrations Independent Evaluation: City of Palo Alto and Prospect Silicon Valley Bay Area Fair Value Commuting (FVC) Demonstration Project Evaluation Plan

MOD Sandbox Demonstrations Independent Evaluation: City of Palo Alto and Prospect Silicon Valley Bay Area Fair Value Commuting (FVC) Demonstration Project Evaluation Plan

Authors: Gustave Cordahi; Susan Shaheen, PhD; Elliot Martin, PhD; and Mikaela Hoffman-Stapleton Date: December 2018 Abstract: The Bay Area FVC Demonstration seeks to reduce Bay Area SOV commute share by implementing a FVC set of solutions designed to address many of the issues described above. Stanford University’s commute program provides the conceptual FVC starting point. Stanford reduced SOV from 75 percent to 50 percent (with transit share increasing from 8 percent to 31 percent), eliminating the need for $107 million in new parking structures. Two key concepts will be demonstrated with this project: An integrated “Commuter Wallet” software platform will attempt to maximize convenience for commuters to plan, compare, and pay for alternative transportation modes. Enterprise backend systems will be coordinated to present commute incentives and benefits seamlessly to employees. Either a “feebate” system or a “cash out” system will be demonstrated. A “feebate” system will simultaneously assess fees for SOV use (assigning a “fair value”) and redirect the income received to fund incentives for use of alternative transportation modes, creating a self-sustaining commute program. A “cash out” system is an incentive-based program where an incentive is paid to non-SOV employees. While a pure cash out program would not address the “fee” part, it is highly likely that a cash out program would generate measurable reductions in car use by participating employees. The FVC project consists of five components: Component #1: Enterprise Commute Trip Reduction (ECTR) software platforms automate employer commute programs. ECTR platforms will integrate with employer human resources and payroll functions and distribute benefits such as loading Clipper transit fare cards and allowing pre-tax commuter benefits purchase...
MOD Sandbox Demonstrations Independent Evaluation: CTA Integrated Fare Systems From Transit Fare to Bike Share Project Evaluation Plan

MOD Sandbox Demonstrations Independent Evaluation: CTA Integrated Fare Systems From Transit Fare to Bike Share Project Evaluation Plan

Authors: Gustave Cordahi; Susan Shaheen, PhD; and Elliot Martin, PhD Date: December 2018 Abstract: CTA has partnered with the Chicago Department of Transportation (CDOT), whose customers have access to more than 580 Divvy Bike Share stations and over 5,800 bikes located throughout the region; this includes the ability to make connections to Divvy at 75 percent of CTA’s rail stations and nearly 50 percent of CTA’s bus stops. These connections greatly increase CTA’s reach throughout the Chicago metropolitan region. Divvy bikes are used by commuters, tourists and recreational riders for convenient and healthy trips around the downtown, in 44 city neighborhoods, and in 2 suburbs. To increase access to the bike sharing program, Divvy has recently placed 65 new stations in 12 primarily low-income neighborhoods and developed an alternative fee structure to encourage ridership. With CTA’s partners (CDOT, Cubic and Divvy), CTA has proposed two modifications to the Ventra App that will allow customers to more easily access Divvy bikes and establish a platform to expand this opportunity to other ride sharing modes of transportation in the future. 1. Phase 1 of the project will incorporate Divvy bike station locations and status in to the Ventra trip planner so that customers can identify, in real-time, the availability of a bike at their transit stop, or the availability of a docking station at the destination of their bike trip. The initial phase will also include a Deep Link to the existing Divvy App so that new customers can create a Divvy account, and existing Divvy members will be able to obtain a bike unlock code. 2. Phase 2 will further integrate Divvy functionality into the Ventra App so that customers can pay for their Divvy bike with their Ventra transit value or other payment source to receive...

How Public Education on Ecodriving Can Reduce Both Fuel Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Authors: Elliot W Martin, Nelson D Chan, Susan A Shaheen Published: January 2012 Abstract: Ecodriving, the concept of changing driving behavior and vehicle maintenance to impact fuel consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in existing vehicles, has gained recent prominence in North America. One ecodriving strategy involves public education through Internet-based information dissemination. This paper presents the results of a controlled stated-response study conducted from June to December 2010 with approximately 100 University of California, Berkeley faculty, staff, and students, assessing the effectiveness of static ecodriving web-based information. A comparison of the experimental and control groups found that exposure to ecodriving information influenced people’s driving behavior and maintenance practices. The experimental group’s distributional shift was statistically significant, particularly for key practices including: lower highway cruising speed, driving behavior adjustment, and proper tire inflation. Within the experimental group (N = 51), fewer respondents significantly changed their maintenance practices (16%) than the majority that altered some driving practices (71%); this suggests intentional altering of driving behavior is easier than planning better maintenance practices. A comparison of before-and-after surveys found that 57% of the experimental group improved their ecodriving behavior, while 43% made no change or worsened. Key characteristics of the drivers that improved include: being female, living in smaller households, and owning a newer car with higher fuel economy. While it was evident that not everyone modifies their behavior as a result of reviewing the website, even small shifts in behavior due to inexpensive information dissemination could be deemed cost effective in reducing fuel consumption and emissions. View...

Innovative Mobility Services & Technologies: A Pathway Towards Transit Flexibility, Convenience, and Choice

Authors: Susan Shaheen Published: 2012 Abstract: The number of senior citizens is expected to double by the year 2020, representing 18% of the nation’s population. After age 75, driving performance begins to decline due to changes in health and medication effects. Indeed, one quarter of seniors over 75 are expected to require alternative transportation services in the future. This chapter examines transit and innovative mobility options to better meet the needs of the growing older population in the near (2011) and more distant (2021) future.Barriers to transit use among older adults include anxiety and confusion about using transit; inconvenience; cost and payment; safety; and physical discomfort. Emerging intelligent transportation systems (ITS) technologies can help to overcome these barriers and provide alternative mobility options, such as real-time information, simpler payment, demand-responsive door-to-door services, carsharing, and smart parking linked to transit. Other approaches include user training, smaller and more comfortable vehicles, and low-floor buses. While the scaling and cost reduction benefits of ITS are exciting, there are several obstacles to wide-scale deployment. One of the most significant is coordination among health and human service and transportation providers, particularly in suburban and rural locations. Some operators already struggle to provide services, and many staffers have limited experience with ITS technology. Thus, a concerted effort is needed across many different types of transit agencies to share information and compatible technologies. In the future, coordination strategies and ITS technologies will play a critical role in providing more flexibility, convenience, and choice for older travelers. View...