UC Berkeley releases report on disaster evacuations

UC Berkeley releases report on disaster evacuations

Aidan Freeman July 12, 2019   A U.C. Berkeley team that conducted wildfire evacuation focus group research in Lake County released a report this week that recommends more use by government agencies of the sharing economy during disaster evacuations. The report, entitled “Current State of the Sharing Economy and Evacuations: Lessons from California,” investigates the public perception and potential impacts of ridesharing and homesharing during events like the Mendocino Complex Fire of 2018, for which the Berkeley team hosted a Spanish-speaking focus group to study that demographic’s stance on sharing homes or vehicles during emergencies. The Berkeley study’s primary authors, Stephen Wong and Susan Shaheen, write that “In many evacuations including wildfire evacuations, public agencies often do not have enough resources to evacuate and shelter all citizens.” “Consequently,” they continue, “we propose that the sharing economy, through private companies and/or private citizens, could be leveraged in disasters for transportation and sheltering resources.” The need for more efficient means of transport during and emergency evacuation was made horrifically clear during the Camp Fire in November when thousands of Paradise residents attempted to flee the approaching fire at once along just a few viable exit routes, resulting in congestion and many casualties. In Lake County, roughly 19,000 residents were evacuated during the Mendocino Complex Fire last year. But in rural counties like Lake, Wong noted in an interview, the sharing economy manifests differently than it does in urban areas. Tech-based ridesharing companies like Uber and Lyft are hardly present in Lake County at all, and while homeshares through Airbnb are present here, most of the subjects in the Berkeley focus group were...
Shuttle Express into the Future

Shuttle Express into the Future

Bosch June 14, 2019   Does the future of our everyday mobility lie in self-driving shuttle busses? Professor Susan Shaheen has looked into how this new form of mobility can be organized equitably for everybody. She says the transition on our roads has already begun…   Read the full article here: Shuttle Express into the...
TSRC Study Earns Transport Policy Prize

TSRC Study Earns Transport Policy Prize

ITS Berkeley June 4, 2019   Congratulations to Transportation Sustainability Research Center Co-Director and Civil and Environmental Engineering professor Susan Shaheen, Professor Emeritus of City and Regional Planning Robert Cervero, and former graduate students Lisa Rayle (Data Science at Facebook), Danielle Dai (City of Oakland Mobility Programs Manager), and Nelson Chan (Interaction Designer at Internet Brands/WebMD) on earning the Transport Policy Prize from the World Conference on Transportation Research (WCTR).  The Transport Policy Prize for the most influential Paper is in recognition of the most influential paper published in the Transport Policy Journal during the last three years preceding the conference, and is only awarded every three years. It is chosen by a Sub-Committee of WCTRS comprised of all the editors of Transport Policy and the Chair of the WCTRS Prize Committee. The Editor in Chief serves as chairperson for the Sub-Committee. The journal article from article in Transport Policy (published in 2016), “Just a Better Taxi? A Survey-Based Comparison of Taxis, Transit, and Ridesourcing Services in San Francisco” presents….   Read the full article here: TSRC Study Earns Transport Policy...
Understanding Impacts of Incentives on One-Way Electric Vehicle Carsharing: A Case Study of Car2go in San Diego

Understanding Impacts of Incentives on One-Way Electric Vehicle Carsharing: A Case Study of Car2go in San Diego

Susan Shaheen April 23, 2019 With carsharing, individuals gain the benefits of private-vehicle use without the costs and responsibilities of ownership. One-way (or point-to-point) carsharing is a form of carsharing that enables members to pick up a vehicle at one location and drop it off at another. Typically, the carsharing operator provides gasoline, parking, and maintenance. Generally, participants pay a fee each time they use a vehicle. A few popular free-floating carsharing services include: Car2go and DriveNow, recently joined forces to become SHARE NOW – a new joint venture between Daimler AG and BMW Group that consists of a connected ecosystem of five mobility solutions: one-way carsharing, transportation network companies (TNCs, also known as ridesourcing and ridehailing), multimodal trip planning, parking, and charging. The service includes more than 20,000 carsharing vehicles worldwide (including 3,200 electric vehicles) in 30 cities and 13 countries. Under this new joint venture, ReachNow, which operates carsharing and TNC services in Seattle and Portland, also joined forces with moovel to become REACH NOW, the multimodal unit of the joint venture. Ten percent of ReachNow’s fleet is electric with 720,000 electric vehicle (EV) miles driven in less than two years. Twenty-five percent of members have driven electric, which have saved more than 200+ tons of carbon dioxide (CO2). Zipcar Flex – a free floating carsharing service comprised of approximately 300 EVs in London, UK. EVO carsharing operates a free-floating carsharing program in Vancouver, Canada using hybrid vehicles. These are just a few examples of the numerous carsharing programs operating across the globe…. Read the full article here:...
The Transformation of Transportation

The Transformation of Transportation

Mile Marker Summer 2018 Study Looks at How We’ll Get From Here to There as Caltrans Plans for Future. New technology, evolving economic and societal directions, and a changing climate are creating a seismic shift in the way California moves people and goods — and that makes transportation planning particularly challenging. A new study commissioned by Caltrans suggests that the field of transportation is in the midst of a transformation not experienced since the invention of the automobile. There are many intriguing possibilities and trends emerging, according to the Future of Mobility White Paper, which is intended to inform Caltrans planners who will lay the groundwork for California’s transportation network into 2050. “The rapid changes in the transportation industry will dramatically alter California’s transportation system and affect the way Caltrans operates,” said Chris Schmidt, Caltrans’ Division Chief of Transportation Planning. “The Department will have to develop and implement realistic policies while taking into account rapidly changing technological advancements, many of which continue to evolve and new ones emerge.” The revolution in moving people and goods has already arrived. In just the last five years, ride-sourcing companies such as Uber and Lyft, car-sharing services like Getaround and car2go, and bike-sharing businesses such as Spin and Ford GoBike have expanded market share. Autonomous vehicles are a reality, drones and self-driving trucks could shake up the goods-moving industry, and technologies considered unthinkable a decade ago — such as hyperloop and air taxis — are no longer just science fiction imagination. Not only are modes of transportation changing, but major advancements have been made in vehicle safety technology. The refinement of on-board cameras,...