Innovative Mobility Services & Technologies: A Pathway Towards Transit Flexibility, Convenience, and Choice

Authors: Susan Shaheen Published: 2012 Abstract: The number of senior citizens is expected to double by the year 2020, representing 18% of the nation’s population. After age 75, driving performance begins to decline due to changes in health and medication effects. Indeed, one quarter of seniors over 75 are expected to require alternative transportation services in the future. This chapter examines transit and innovative mobility options to better meet the needs of the growing older population in the near (2011) and more distant (2021) future.Barriers to transit use among older adults include anxiety and confusion about using transit; inconvenience; cost and payment; safety; and physical discomfort. Emerging intelligent transportation systems (ITS) technologies can help to overcome these barriers and provide alternative mobility options, such as real-time information, simpler payment, demand-responsive door-to-door services, carsharing, and smart parking linked to transit. Other approaches include user training, smaller and more comfortable vehicles, and low-floor buses. While the scaling and cost reduction benefits of ITS are exciting, there are several obstacles to wide-scale deployment. One of the most significant is coordination among health and human service and transportation providers, particularly in suburban and rural locations. Some operators already struggle to provide services, and many staffers have limited experience with ITS technology. Thus, a concerted effort is needed across many different types of transit agencies to share information and compatible technologies. In the future, coordination strategies and ITS technologies will play a critical role in providing more flexibility, convenience, and choice for older travelers. View...

Automated Speed Enforcement for California: A Review of Legal and Institutional Issues

Authors: Caroline J. Rodier, Ph.D, Susan A. Shaheen, Ph.D, Ellen Cavanagh Published: February 21, 2007 Abstract: Excessive speed is considered to be a major contributing factor to motor vehicle crashes and is thus an important focus of highway enforcement efforts. Automated speed enforcement programs have been widely applied outside the U.S. to address speeding-related safety problems. This literature review explores the potential benefits and barriers to implementing automated speed enforcement programs in the U.S. by examining the large body of literature on automated enforcement programs, including red-light and speed programs....

Innovative Corridors Initiative: Business Model Analysis

Authors: Rachel S. Finson, Virginia Lingham, Susan A. Shaheen, Ph.D Published: February 21, 2007 Abstract: The Innovative Corridors Initiative (ICI) Business Model Analysis examines public-private partnerships designed to deploy intelligent transportation systems (ITS) technologies that can improve transportation system management and provide real-time  information to users. This study builds on the business models proposed by industry in response to the ICI Call for Submissions (CFS). In addition, case studies examine the business models that are developing between the private and public sectors for roadside rest stop wireless Internet access, vehicle infrastructure integration, and Traffic.com, Inc. Caltrans’ current procedures for encroachment and procurement are reviewed briefly to identify possible areas of conflict that may need to be resolved prior to launching future CFS-style solicitations. Planning recommendations are provided to assist Caltrans with planning for future CFS-style solicitations, including considerations regarding goals, purpose and project partners, authority, and  post-demonstration relationships. Issues for Caltrans to consider pertaining to authority for CFS-style solicitations as well as the procurement of products that are demonstrated under these solicitations are highlighted....

Innovative Corridors Initiative: Call for Submission Process and Evaluation

Authors: Rachel S. Finson, Cynthia McCormick, Susan A. Shaheen, Ph.D. Published: March 14, 2007 Abstract: The Innovative Corridors Initiative represents an innovative business model for public agencies to partner with private industry to improve transportation system management and provide real time information to users. The Call for Submissions (CFS) issued by Caltrans, MTC, LA MTA, ITS America, and CCIToffered private industry access to public rights-of-way and data. However, no funds were offered as part of the CFS, meaning the companies that submitted a proposal and participated needed to have the capacity to self-fund their projects. This report provides a summary of the processes to implement the CFS, including public outreach, proposal review, negotiations between the public agencies and private companies, operations, coordination with the 2005 ITS World Congress in San Francisco, and project closure. Researchers chronicled the lessons learned throughout the process through a series of interviews conducted with the parties involved. Especially important were findings related to the public-private partnership for ITS deployment that the ICI project pioneered....

Conformity Policy: Air Quality Impact Assessment for Local Transportation Projects

Authors: Randall Guensler, Ph.D, Susan Shaheen, Ph.D, Francisca Mar, Cameron Y. Yee Published: March, 1998 Abstract: The Conformity Rule, adopted in November 1993, by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) under the requirements of Section 17(c)(4) of the Clean Air Act, establishes strict procedures for determining conformity of transportation plans to state air quality management plans. Conformity requirements apply to all transportation plans, programs, and projects, funded or approved under title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Act. The Conformity Rule requires that transportation planning agencies apply transportation demand and emission models to demonstrate that transportation plans and all projects contained in a plan will not exceed the allowable emissions budget established in the air quality management plan and will not cause a violation of local air quality standards. This project was undertaken by the Institute of Transportation Studies at Davis (ITS-Davis) for the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). ITS-Davis researchers were asked to undertake this project for three reasons to: 1) provide objective opinions from individuals outside the purview of agencies responsible for implementing the Rule; 2) identify and discuss technical issues associated with emissions modeling that should be considered in implementing the Rule; and 3) explore potential institutional conflicts that may arise in implementing the Rule. The primary goal of the overall project was to develop a conformity modeling protocol for project analysis. Before the technical modeling guidance document could be developed, the research team undertook a comprehensive review of the Rule and applicable conformity literature to determine where, when, and under what conditions, conformity findings for local projects must be made. The first section of this policy...