Who Will Own the Cars That Drive Themselves?

Who Will Own the Cars That Drive Themselves?

Jim Motavalli May 29, 2020 It was a difficult question even before the coronavirus pandemic hit: When self-driving cars eventually rule the roads, will Americans own their cars or make use of ride-hailing fleets? The challenge is now threefold. Self-driving car technology had already reached a plateau, and getting to full Level 5 autonomy will be more difficult than many had thought. With the nation’s economy hobbled by the virus, investment is slowing. And to car owners, their private automobile is now a sanctuary, and it’s unclear how long that attitude will persist. A CarGurus.com poll of 400 active car shoppers, conducted in May for this article, asked, “What is your overall opinion about the development of self-driving cars?” It showed 22 percent of customers were excited by the prospect. A survey of auto owners in 2019 showed 31 percent of them were excited for autonomous cars. The question about the long-term future for the world’s cars is far from settled, and the experts (some of whom see disaster for the planet if people own autonomous cars as we own our cars now) differ sharply in their perception of where we’re heading… Read the full article...

Mobility and Energy Impacts of Shared Automated Vehicles: a Review of Recent Literature

Authors: Susan Shaheen, PhD and Mohamed Amine Bouzaghrane Date: November 2019 Abstract:  Purpose of Review: The purpose of this review is to present findings from recent research on shared automated vehicles (SAV) impacts on mobility and energy. Recent Findings: While the literature on potential SAV impacts on travel behavior and the environment is still developing, researchers have suggested that SAVs could reduce transportation costs and incur minimal increases in total trip time due to efficient routing to support pooling. Researchers also speculate that SAVs would result in a 55% reduction in energy use and ~ 90% reduction in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Summary: SAV impacts on mobility and energy are uncertain. Researchers should carefully track SAV technology developments and adjust previous model assumptions based on real-world data to produce better impact estimates. SAVs could prove to be a next technological advancement that reshapes the transportation system by providing a safer, efficient, and less costly travel alternative....
Autonomous Vehicles – Part 2: Designing the Future of Transportation w/Susan Shaheen

Autonomous Vehicles – Part 2: Designing the Future of Transportation w/Susan Shaheen

The Leading Edge Podcast December 19, 2019 Podcast host Chris Sands speaks with Innovative Mobility’s Susan Shaheen on the societal and environmental impacts of automated transportation systems. They cover transportation technology’s affect on social equity, city land uses to make way for AV and microbility, energy sources and sustainability, and some of the emerging products from different autonomous vehicle companies. Listen to the episode...
What’s The Future Of Transportation? 16 Experts Share Their Insights

What’s The Future Of Transportation? 16 Experts Share Their Insights

Sam Mire June 30, 2019 Flying cars…crash-proof motorbikes…squirrel chauffers. OK, maybe I’m getting a bit carried away with my personal vision for the future of transportation. But a man can dream, can’t he? For a more realistic vision of the future of transportation, here are some industry insiders kind enough to share their (significantly more trustworthy) insights…   Read the full article here: What’s The Future Of Transportation? 16 Experts Share Their...
Can smart mobility solutions answer transit’s first/last mile challenge?

Can smart mobility solutions answer transit’s first/last mile challenge?

The Globe and Mail July 3, 2019   In a business park on the northwest side of Denver, an autonomous all-electric bus has been shuttling commuters from the 61st and Pena commuter rail station to the building that houses the offices of Panasonic and EasyMile. The first of its kind in Colorado, the shuttle moves people from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday to Friday, as part of a six-month pilot project between the Regional Transportation District (RTD), Denver’s transit agency; EasyMile, a driverless mobility company; and many other project partners. RTD is evaluating the shuttle’s reliability and availability. “RTD wanted to see how easily and effectively it could be integrated into the overall service,” says Lauren Isaac, EasyMile’s director of business initiatives….   Read the full article here: Can smart mobility solutions answer transit’s first/last mile...