Commercial Vehicle Parking in California: Exploratory Evaluation of the Problem and Possible Technology-Based Solutions

Authors: Susan A. Shaheen, Ph.D, Caroline J. Rodier, Ph.D Published: August, 2007 Abstract: The United States is experiencing dramatic growth in commercial vehicle truck travel on our nation’s roadway system as well as critical shortages in truck parking. California ranks first in the nation’s overall (private and public) commercial vehicle parking shortage. Recent estimates of the demand for truck parking in California indicate that demand exceeds capacity at all public rest areas; this is the case at 88 percent of private truck stops on the 34 corridors in California with the highest truck travel volumes. Nationwide, shortages of public truck spaces, however, are considered to be more severe than shortages, but only 16 percent report private shortages. The truck parking shortage in California and the U.S. has a number of serious consequences that threaten our roadway safety, public health, and economic productivity. This study begins with a literature review of the commercial vehicle truck parking problems in California and the United States, available evidence on the truck drivers’ parking preferences, and a description and evaluation of the current and future approaches to the truck parking problem. Next, the results of a statewide trucker survey conducted in 2006, which included questions related to truck parking information services–a promising solution to the truck parking problem suggested in the literature–are presented. The study concludes by summarizing key findings....

Smart Parking Management Field Test: A Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) District Parking Demonstration – Phase One Final Report

Authors: Caroline J. Rodier, Ph.D, Susan A. Shaheen, Ph.D, Charlene Kemmerer Published: October, 2007 Abstract: This report presents an evaluation of the first transit-based smart parking project in the U.S. at the San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) District station in Oakland, California. The report begins with a review of the smart parking literature; next the smart parking field test is described including its capital, operational, and maintenance costs; then the results of the participant survey analysis are presented; and finally lessons learned from the institutional, user, and operational perspective are documented. Some key changes in participant travel behavior include increases in BART mode share, reductions in drive alone modal share, decreased average commute time, and an overall reduction in total vehicle miles of travel. Key lessons learned include that it would have been beneficial to anticipate additional time for project scoping and permitting, and fixed wayfinding signs were beneficial in both directing vehicles from the highway to the smart parking lot and addressing resident concerns about increased traffic. Additionally, the majority of participants continued to use the service when fees were implemented. However, the CMSs were not widely employed in users’ decision-making processes in this application. Finally, the wireless counting system worked well, with the exception of the in-ground sensors, which were prone to miscounts....

Truck Parking and Traffic on I-5 in California: Analysis of a Clipboard Survey and Annual Average Daily Traffic Data

Authors: Elliot Martin, Ph.D, Susan Shaheen, Ph.D Date Published: November 15, 2012 Abstract: Truck parking is a major problem on I-5 in California as truck drivers regularly encounter parking that is at or near capacity, particularly when searching for overnight parking. This creates safety hazards for truck drivers as well as the traveling public. This study reports on the results of a clipboard survey of truck drivers (N = 85) on I-5 in California in Spring 2012. The survey focused on understanding the challenges faced by long haul truck drivers parking in the region and to evaluate the degree to which ITS applications in truck parking, such as real-time parking availability information, would be useful. The survey found that more than 70% of respondents (n=61) indicated that they had encountered truck stops where they would have liked to park but could not because it was full. About 30% of truck drivers stated that they would keep driving under such circumstances. More 50% of truck drivers reported that they encountered truck stops too full to park on I-5 at least every other day, and they predominantly encounter full parking when looking to stop overnight. In addition to completing the survey, researchers developed an approach to illustrate truck traffic over a corridor using Average Annual Daily Traffic (AADT) data. This approach to displaying public information can be used to help understand where truck parking demand is likely highest, as well as to help quantify long-haul truck traffic over specific segments of a highway corridor....

Smart Parking Pilot on the Coaster Commuter Rail Line in San Diego, California

Authors: Tagan Blake, Caroline Rodier, Ph.D, Susan Shaheen, Ph.D Date Published: November 15, 2008 Abstract: Increasingly, public transit authorities are harnessing advances in sensor, payment, and enforcement technologies to operate parking facilities more efficiently. In the short term, these innovations promise to enhance customer parking experiences, increase the effective supply of existing parking with minimal investment, and increase ridership and overall revenue. Over the longer term, these systems could further expand ridership by generating revenue to add parking capacity and improve access. This paper reports on the Smart Parking Pilot Project on the COASTER commuter rail line in San Diego (California, USA), which builds on the transit-based smart parking field test research conducted at the Rockridge San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) District station. The paper begins with a literature review of related parking technology, management and pricing strategies, and the optimization of parking resources at transit facilities. Next, the authors describe results of an initial pilot feasibility study. Finally, the phased smart parking implementation plan, carefully tailored to address key transit-related parking problems at the station and corridor levels, is described along with the pilot project’s evaluation criteria....

Transit-Based Smart Parking in the San Francisco Bay Area, California: Assessment of User Demand and Behavioral Effects

Authors: Caroline Rodier, Susan Shaheen, Amanda Eaken Published: December 31, 2005 Abstract: This paper presents early findings from an application of advanced parking technologies to increase effective parking capacity at a transit station during the first half of 2004 in the San Francisco Bay Area (California). It begins with an extensive review of the literature related to transit-based smart parking management systems to illustrate the range of system configurations and their potential travel, economic, and environmental effects. Two important conclusions from this review are: (1) lack of parking spaces at transit stations may be a significant constraint to transit use, and (2) pre-trip and, perhaps, en-route information on parking availability at transit stations may increase transit use. This is followed by a survey of commuters at the Rockridge BART station that was implemented to gain insight into parking needs, the travel effects of a new monthly paid parking program, and the potential travel effects of a smart parking service. First, it was found that a potential market exists for a daily paid parking information service among current and new riders with relatively high incomes, high auto availability, and variable work locations and schedules. Second, the current monthly reserved paid parking service may have increased the frequency of BART use among subscribers, but it has not reduced net auto travel because of diversions to BART from carpool, bus, and bike modes for their main commute and increased drive alone access to the BART station. View...