Uber Acquires the Bike Share Company JUMP

Uber Acquires the Bike Share Company JUMP

April 10, 2018 By: AARIAN MARSHALL JUMP BIKES HAS a new owner: Uber. The bike-sharing company, launched as Social Bicycles in 2011, runs GPS-enabled programs in twelve cities all over the world, including Portland, Oregon, and Phoenix, Arizona. In San Francisco, Jump’s offerings are both electric and dockless—twin cycling innovations that helped kick off a nationwide (and global) bike-sharing craze. The acquisition is a signal that Uber doesn’t want to be seen as just a taxi substitute, but an urban mobility company. “We’re committed to bringing together multiple modes of transportation within the Uber app—so that you can choose the fastest or most affordable way to get where you’re going, whether that’s in an Uber, on a bike, on the subway, or more,” Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi wrote in a blog post. This isn’t a new concept for the ride-hailing company: In February, Khosrowshahi said he hoped to one day use Uber’s platform to run a city’s bus system.   Read the full article...
Rates at some San Francisco parking meters could climb to $8 an hour — automatically

Rates at some San Francisco parking meters could climb to $8 an hour — automatically

March 15, 2018 By: Eli Wirtschafter San Francisco has made a sweeping change in how much it costs to park in the city. Prices at some meters could sink down to 50 cents an hour. But at other meters, they could rise to eight dollars an hour, depending on the time of day, and how popular the location is. The policy is designed to free up parking space. But due to the explosion of ride-hailing, it may not be improving the way people get around the city. Listen to the full segment...
Mobility on Demand: Three Key Components

Mobility on Demand: Three Key Components

February 27, 2018 By: Susan A. Shaheen, PhD Increasingly, mobility customers are turning to on-demand service providers to access an array of mobility options. Mobility on demand (MOD) is an innovative transportation concept where all consumers can access mobility, goods, and services on demand by dispatching or using shared mobility, delivery services, and public transportation solutions through an integrated and connected multi-modal network. The most advanced forms of MOD passenger services incorporate trip planning and booking, real-time information, and fare payment into a single user interface. Passenger modes facilitated through MOD providers include: carsharing, bikesharing, ridesharing, ridesourcing/transportation network companies (TNCs), scooter sharing, microtransit, shuttle services, public transportation, and other emerging transportation solutions. The most advanced forms of MOD courier services incorporate robotic delivery, app-based courier network services (CNS), and aerial delivery services (e.g., drones). Fundamentally, MOD is about how people make mobility decisions, how they move, how they consume goods and services, and the stakeholders that make it possible. In this blog, we explore three key components of MOD 1) The principle of commodification; 2) Importance of public-private partnerships and stakeholder groups; and 3) Changes in consumption, goods deliver, and mobility are interrelated and integral to MOD. Read the full blog post...
Uber and Lyft crushed taxis—is the commercial parking industry next?

Uber and Lyft crushed taxis—is the commercial parking industry next?

February 21, 2018 By: Matthew Flamm and Daniel Geiger As head of Garage Management Co. for the past 30 years, Gordon Hamm has seen peaks and valleys in New York’s parking business. But he’s never seen anything like the past 18 months. Despite a healthy economy and record employment in a city that’s more crowded than ever, business at his company’s 57 garages is down across the board.— And it’s not just Garage Management that’s suffering. Interviews with other parking industry leaders show a sector on the verge of a shakeup as operators struggle with rising labor costs and declining demand for a parking space for an evening, a day or just a couple of hours. The problem goes deeper than any swing in the economy. New Yorkers are changing how they get around. Parking operators have been hit by a one-two punch: more people using Lyft and Uber, which has slowed Manhattan traffic to a crawl and thus discouraged those with personal vehicles from driving into the city. Read the rest of the story...
10 Commandments for Making Future Cities More Livable

10 Commandments for Making Future Cities More Livable

February 1, 2018 By: JACK STEWART The term “livable city” has been kicking around since the 1980s, but it’s never had much of a definition. It’s clearly a good thing for attracting residents, businesses, and investors. Yet depending on who wants to live how and where, it entails elements of mobility and sustainability, investment and entrepreneurship. Today, 15 tech companies devoted to reshaping the way we move came together to define the euphemism. These ride-sharing, bike-sharing, and transit companies signed a joint pledge to “prioritize people over vehicles”, lower emissions, encourage data sharing, and other lofty goals that should make cities nicer places to live—if everyone can just get on board. The “Shared Mobility Principles for Livable Cities” is the work of Zipcar co-founder Robin Chase, along with a group of city and transport organizations. They’re heavy on future-gazing talking points. The word mobility comes up a lot. “For most cities, urban planners, legislators and residents, there is a cacophony of advice,” says Chase. She wants the shared principles to cut through it all with simple, sensible guidelines. Read the rest of the article...